Juvet Landscape Hotel

The Juvet Landscape Hotel may be located on a small farm estate dating back to the 16th century, but the architecture of the new rooms is decidedly futuristic.

The architect's brief was to showcase the nature surrounding the hotel, rather than the rooms themselves, and to create a sense of actually being outside in the elements while in the comfort of a warm and dry room. A big ask, you might think, but achieved in style as it's pretty difficult to tear your eyes away from the views of endless forest and mountains from the rooms' vast walls of windows. Exhibitionists will be disappointed to hear that the glass is smoked so you can see out while no-one can see in. Mind you, not that there's anyone for miles around.

As if the sight of nature wasn't enough, the hotel designers wanted guests' other senses stimulated as well, hence two small windows by the bed you can open to hear the nearby Valldøla river flowing by at night.

There are ten pinewood built rooms in total, and in the spirit of Scandinavian minimalism furniture is kept to a bare minimum of bed, lamp and a couple of armchairs. Only the bathrooms - a riot of vivid yellow - break from the pared back look and feel.

In a further nod to the pristine environment surrounding the hotel, the rooms were constructed on steel rods and one day could be dismantled entirely. 'We are guests in nature,' explains head architect Jan Olav Jensen. 'So it's a good idea that hotels can be taken away without leaving scars behind.'

When not gawping at the views, guests can take their pick of activities in both winter and summer. In March and April there are nearby ski resorts and excellent off-piste and ski-touring opportunities, but the place really looks at its best in summer. Think trekking on trails through pine and birch forests or rafting, zip-wiring or canyoning on the beautiful Valldøla river that runs in a gorge beneath the rooms. Alternatively, it's a case of sitting back, taking in a deep breath of mountain air and enjoying the big country all around you.

Why We Love It
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One of the walking trails around the hotel is named after Viking king Olav Haraldsson, said to have inspired the nursery rhyme London Bridge is Falling Down after destroying said river crossing in a stereotypical act of Viking uncouthness.

Harriet, Original Traveller

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Kate L and Victoria are our 'Juvet Landscape Hotel' experts and as seasoned travellers they have the inside track on the most memorable adventures.

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