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Where to See the Best Trees in the World

Where to See the Best Trees in the World

If you aren’t an arboriculturist or a tree enthusiast, it may be likely that to you, a tree is just a tree. You may even think trees are just somewhere to shelter under in the rain or something a cat might get stuck up, however our Earth is brimming with leafy wonders of all shapes and sizes, some filled with magical flowers, some standing tall above the rest. The Whomping Willow from 'Harry Potter' or the Tree of Life from 'The Lion King' may come to mind when you think of famous trees, but we would like to introduce you to some non-fiction characters who are competing for the top spot as some of the best trees in the world…

 

Rainbow Eucalyptus

Indonesia

Rainbow Eucalyptus might be the closest leafy relative to a painter’s palette that you’ve ever seen. Found deep in the Indonesian rainforest on the island of Sumatra, where rainfall and sunlight are in ample supply, you may think these large evergreens are the victim of an overenthusiastic graffiti artist, but the colourful trees are actually just an unbelievable product of nature and arguably one of the best trees in the world. The trunks of these kaleidoscopic trees are naturally ‘painted’ (for lack of a better word) with stripes in shades of orange, lemon and lime. As layers peel off over time, the bark beneath is exposed to air and turns from rich brown to turquoise blue before taking on citrus hues, leaving layers so vibrant and rich they almost look artificial. These magnificent trees are safeguarded by virtue of their remoteness, with deforestation as their main threat, so embark on a guided trek into the rich Indonesian rainforest to discover one of nature’s most stunning creations.

Rainbow eucalyptus trees in an Indonesian rainforest

 

Ashikaga Forest and Cherry Trees

Japan

In the spring, Japan turns pink as the heavenly hues of cherry blossom fill green spaces across the country. The trees and their rose quartz blooms are the country’s national flower and are one of the first things tourists flock to see when winter’s wild weather dissipates. A lesser-known gem of Japanese springtime (giving the cherry blossom a run for its money) is the cascading periwinkle petals and pale crimson corollas of the ancient wisteria trees that fill Ashikaga Flower Park. The star of the show, a 150-year-old blooming beauty, sits in the centre of the park, its honey-scented flowers overflowing its trellis supports, creating idyllic tunnels that rival the most magical fairytale setting. Take a leisurely wander through this plant-filled paradise on a guided tour to snap some unbelievable photos with one of the best trees in the world.

Japanese wisteria tree in Ashikaga Forest

 

Grove of Titans

USA

Tucked away in a sheltered glen in Jedediah Smith Redwoods State Park in California, are some of the largest redwoods by volume in the world. These ancient trees tower over the forest below, as if plucked from an Alice in Wonderland book after drinking a magic growth potion. The Grove of Titans in California was a well-kept secret until its GPS coordinates were leaked in 2011, opening the floodgates to visitors and succumbing the area to the ‘Instagram curse’. Ferns were trampled, groundcover worn away and tree roots exposed, leaving the Grove lacking its pristine character, all for that one perfect selfie. An elevated walkway has been under construction for a few years so that people can meander through the grove without leaving a trace. With the completion date for the rest of the trail set for this summer, exploring these gentle giants respectfully is a must.

Ancient redwood forest in California

 

Avenue of the Baobabs

Madagascar

The great bodies of Madagascar’s baobab trees appear from the fog, towering overhead like giants, with streaks of silvery sunlight cutting through their skeletal branches. As the country’s first natural national monument, the Avenue of the Baobabs is one of the most remote yet accessible places to wander through these incredible trees. Meander up the rust-red dirt track through the group of woody perennials and stumble upon baobab Amoureux, their trunks twisted into a perfect embrace, earning them the nickname of ‘Baobabs in Love’. The Disneyesque perfection and bleak beauty of these extraordinary trees puts them safely on our list of the best trees in the world. The area is also the perfect place to wander into the wilderness for some world-class birdwatching or to explore the otherworldly limestone spires and wonky spikes of Tsingy de Bemaraha with an expert guide.

Avenue of the Baobabs in Madagascar

 

Trees of the Oyamel Forest

Mexico

For five months of the year, you can barely see the trees in Mexico's Oyamel Forest. Although the fir trees that grow here are impressive, reaching a dizzying height of up to 164ft tall, it is their fluttering residents that have caught our eye. The bright-orange and black-tip winged monarch butterflies act as a fluttering cloak over these sacred trees, creating one of the most otherworldly spectacles on Earth. Legend has it that these winged creatures are souls coming back from the dead, visiting for the night of Día de Muertos (Day of the Dead), so time your visit with these Mexican festivities to catch a glimpse of some of the world’s most incredible trees becoming home to one of the most unbelievable spectacles on Earth.

Monarch butterflies in Oyamel Forest, Mexico

 

Pando Trees

USA

Would you believe us if we told you the world’s largest organism is a tree? To be more specific, it is a network of aspen trees, interconnected and intertwined by an extensive root system, creating a seemingly never-ending network of amber-leafed trees in Fishlake National Forest, Utah. The sun bounces off the golden leaves creating a heavenly glow, and the wind picks its way through the fluttering branches, giving the ‘Trembling Giant’ its nickname. Grab your camera and head into the fairytale-like forest to capture some Insta-worthy snaps of one of the best trees in the world, before taking a dip in Meadow Hot Springs or wandering through the winding caves and rocky caverns of Meadow Lava Tubes. 

Pando Trees in Utah