So what's up? It's more a question of what's down, and particularly against the Pound, thanks to a resurgent British economy. The rest will inevitably catch up (we're good sports like that) so the exchange rate bonanza won't last, but in the meantime there are bargains to be had. The World's on sale - get shopping!

Here are the best currency improvements of late:

View of Argentinian Mountains

Argentinian Peso: Down 48% v March 2012

Watching the Peso in freefall can feel like an extreme sport, but for the traveller to Argentina the benefits are also extreme. Granted, many of the best hotels price in Dollars (no bad thing at the moment, as I'll discuss later) but it's in the bars and restaurants that the big savings are to be made. Go on, upgrade that sizzling 20 oz steak and max out on the Malbec.

Elephants in South Africa

South Africa Rand: Down 35% v March 2012

No, that isn't a typo, the South African Rand has been heading south for a couple of years now, and you would now pay over a third less for the privilege of visiting this African Queen than in March 2012. With Namibia's Dollar pegged to the Rand, the Rainbow Nation's north-westerly neighbour is also better value than any time since Christmas 2010.

Japan's Mount Fuji

Japanese Yen: Down 30% v March 2012

'I'd LOVE to go to Japan, but it's just too expensive.' We've heard it - and thought it - ourselves. Well, here's a 30% discount. On us. No, we insist. Will there ever be a better time to go? We doubt it.

View of a mosque at sunrise in Instanbul

Turkish Lira: Down 28% v March 2012

Turkey is another Original Travel favourite and another currency winner. Sadly many of the hotels price in Euros, but if you're shopping or partying (Istanbul's favourite pastime) then you will feel a full 28% flusher than this time 24 months ago.

A fishing boat in North Bali

Indonesian Rupiah: Down 25% v March 2012

Indonesia is THE happening destination in Asia thanks to a combination of sillily seductive luxury hotels, captivating culture and almost infinite (well, more than 18,000 at any rate) island idylls. Oh, and it's 25% cheaper than this time two years ago. When we're talking a 5 digit currency, getting 19,090 Rupiah to the Pound instead of 14,313 sounds pretty darn good. What are you waiting for?

Reflection of Taj Mahal in Agra

Indian Rupee: Down 23% v March 2012

Need an excuse to visit India, possibly the most charismatic country on the planet? You shouldn't, but with the Rupee losing nearly a quarter of its value against the Pound in the last two years we hope that might tip the balance.

Aerial view of the Sydney Opera House and Harbour

Australian Dollar : Down 22% v March 2012

Ha! Australia may be better than us at cricket again, but our currency's winning, which means we can head down under for a fifth less than this time last year. You may have to stomach the inevitable Ashes gloating but with prices as they are, Australia is impossible to resist and remains one of the most beautiful and rewarding destinations on Earth.

Central Park in New York in Winter

The Dollar: Down 17% v March 2009

The stars and stripes are in alignment as the Dollar weakens and interest in the US of A booms. As we went to press (always wanted to write that) the Dollar was only four cents off a five year low against the Pound. Better still, it's not just America that's cheaper - several other destinations around the world price (to us) in Dollars, including many countries in Latin America and Africa.

View of a bridge and the canal in Venice

The Euro: Down 12% v March 2009

How on earth the Euro has managed to retain its strength against the Pound despite the turmoil of the last couple of years is well and truly beyond us simple folk at Original Travel, but take a longer term view and a holiday in Eurozone countries is still 12% cheaper than at the height of the financial crisis in 2009.

* Boring but important footnote: If you've already booked your holiday to one of these destinations with Original Travel I'm afraid these currency contortions don't mean a refund - after all, we forward contract and we would never come cap in hand should the currency move the other way!